Crimea is (not) Ours

A new documentary by the Civic Solidarity Platform reveals life in Crimea after it was annexed by Russia in 2014.

Crimea is a peninsula in the Black Sea with unique nature and complicated history. As a result of events of February and March 2014 Crimea that used to be Ukrainian became a part of Russia.

Kremlin says it became the result of a lawful will of people of Crimea. Ukraine claims what happened was a military annexation. This point of view is shared by most countries of the world and international organisations, including the UN, Council of Europe and the OSCE.

Many inhabitants of the peninsula welcomed joining Russia. But dozens of thousands of people have fled Crimea, and keep leaving it, including Crimean Tatars and Ukrainians.

How is the peninsula doing? What are its prospects? And whose is Crimea in reality?

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On 26 May 2017, Irish NGO Front Line Defenders named Emil Kurbedinov the 2017 Laureate of its annual Award for Human Rights Defenders at Risk.

By Yuri Lukanov, an independent journalist with Ukraine's Human Rights Information Centre and international advocacy specialist. On Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula, the Russian authorities are suppressing freedom of speech so that no one will really know what has happened there. Journalists in particular are under threat.

Experts of the Human Rights Information Centre prepared the Review on situation with freedom of speech in Crimea. The data was obtained as a result of “first-hand” monitoring, based on information from official sources and legislation, as well as other open sources that underwent additional verification.